The Ng Tung Chai Falls

Introduction

As I have mentioned on several occasions in these pages, my navigational skills are not up to scratch. So, it shouldn’t come as any surprise to learn that we attempted the Ng Tung Chai falls without bothering to look at the readily available route map.

As a result, we were unprepared for the first part of the route which was along a single-track road that lead us up into the hills. It wasn’t particularly onerous but rather boring, because we didn’t know what to expect until we arrived at the Man Tak Yuen temple where the concrete road gave way to a footpath. We then hiked up to the Bottom Falls.

The route and getting to the start

Take the 64K KMB bus from either the terminus at Tai Po Market Station or pick it up at Tai Wo MTR. The Ng Tung Chai stop will be announced. Please remember to bring sufficient water with you as there are no shops along the route. If, like me, you use a water filtration bottle or similar system you can make use of the tap in the public toilet near the beginning of the walk.

The route map courtesy of the Leisure & Cultural Services Department

Alighting from the bus, start the route by walking up Chai Kek Road. The route is well signposted and as there are few turn-offs you can’t go too far wrong.

You will soon come to the public toilet.

Shortly after you come to the ornate archway for Man Tak Gardens. From this point onwards the scenery becomes more interesting.

Following Man Tak Garden you soon come onto the footpath.

The scenery along the way
The sign at the beginning of the footpath. Personally, I did not find the path that difficult but the bad weather warning is certainly valid

After the concrete road, the footpath was a pleasant change. It was quite steep in places but for the most part, well maintained.

I always manage to find a rock with my name on it

 

It wasn’t long before we came to a sign announcing that we had reached the Bottom Fall. You have to leave the main footpath and descend a fairly steep path down to the river where you will get a great view of the falls. Although we were tired, it was well worth the effort and we rested on the rocks below the falls.

 

With regard to water, if you bring along a filtration device it would be possible to drink the water, but it’s always wiser to make sure you have sufficient water before setting out. Also, while the water is running, you should be aware that some hikers take a swim in the upper falls.

It is not uncommon to see hikers ascending the rock face beside the falls so that they can jump into the rock pool below. In 2019 one hiker was killed and another badly injured after falling from these rocks.

After resting we made our way back up to the footpath. The Middle and Upper falls were not too far away, but we decided to leave them for another day and made our way back down to Lam Kam Road.

Conclusions

A little bit of homework on our part would have prepared us for the hike but despite that, it was quite pleasant. The Ng Tung Chai Falls is on my bucket list of routes to be repeated in the coming season.

SGW: You need to be careful of the weather with regard to rain. Sitting on the rocks beneath a waterfall is the last place you want to be if it starts raining.

Getting home was simply a matter of walking back down to Lam Kam Road and waiting for the 64K bus to take us back to Tai Po.

Thank you for visiting Stewart Goes Walkies. I hope you enjoyed this post. Please feel free to leave a comment and, if you would like us to publish an adventure of yours, you can contact us here:

 

 

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Published by stewartgoeswalkies

Happily married man to a wonderful lady. Living in Hong Kong. In my younger days I enjoyed hiking, camping and rock climbing. I've trekked in the Himalayas and climbed Mt. Kinabalu in East Malaysia.

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